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. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
>> couric: tonight, rebels in libya beat back attempts by the army to retake lost territory. the u.s. steps up the pressure on cadmy to quit, but he's still not giving up. i'm katie couric. also tonight, deep trouble in the midwest. heavy rain and melting snow adds up to flooding that's sweeping through hundreds of homes. are teachers taking a lesson from the labor dispute in wisconsin? a union leader is giving some ground on the red-hot issue of tenure. and the american spirit. an artist who brings to life a world his eyes cannot see. from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. moammar qaddafi's latest offensive was a colossal failure and tonight he's more isolated than ever. troops loyal to qaddafi tried to retake three cities overnight but they were repelled by rebel forces. today in one of those cities, zawiyah, there were celebrations in the streets. the people are firmly in charge and demanding qaddafi go. secretary of state hillary clinton warned that unless he does, libya is at risk of a lo
. but defense secretary gates said they would be used in libya only for emergency evacuations or to deliver relief supplies. he raised a host of reservations about military intervention. no authorization from either the u.n. or nato, reluctance to tie up force which is might be needed in afghanistan, concerns about fanning anti-american sentiment in the rest of the arab world. >> we also have to think about, frankly, the use of the u.s. military in another country in the middle east. >> reporter: gates said he was unable to gauge the rebels' chances of overthrowing qaddafi. >> it remains to be seen how effectively military leaders who have defected from qaddafi's forces can organize the opposition in the country. >> reporter: secretary of state clinton ticked off future scenarios for libya, and two out of three were bad. >> libya could become a peaceful democracy or it could face protracted civil war or it could descend into chaos. >> reporter: the u.s. and britain are openly talking about setting up a no-fly zone over libya. >> it is not acceptable to have a situation where colonel qaddafi
'll see you in 30 minutes, cbs evening news is next. >> couric: tonight president obama warns the u.s. and nato are considering a military response to the crisis in libya as qaddafi's forces step up attacks on rebel-held oil towns. i'm katie couric. the violence is driving up the price you pay at the pump. but where's the money going? maybe not where you think, and should the u.s. tap the strategic reserves to bring prices down? they're here, the new 3-d mammograms. but should women be rushing to get one? and she's worn his m.i.a. bracelet for nearly 40 years waiting for the day she could remove it. that day has come. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. libyan government forces were back on the offensive today trying to retake more territory still held by the rebels. some of the heaviest fighting was in towns near tripoli and the u.n. says more than a million libyans now need humanitarian aid. president obama warned moammar qaddafi and his supporters they will be
qaddafi and his supporters they will be held accountable for the violence and the u.s. and its allies are still considering military options. today, nato plans began round-the-clock surveillance of libya. opposition forces in the east want nato to ground qaddafi's air force after it bombed several key oil towns today. mandy clark reports tonight from abbey ya. >> reporter: this is why libya's rebels are begging for a no-fly zone. we were the first journalists on the scene after this bombing. people ignored the danger and raced to show us the damage. he's hitting his own people with bombs, young children, he's killing them, this man says. just minutes ago we were driving down the road to get to the front line when a government warplane dropped two bombs behind us. the shrapnel from those bombs is still warm. near the craters, the wreckage of a pickup truck. a family with three children was in it when qaddafi's air force struck. two of the children died. the survivors were slashed by the slash nell. the circling warplanes made for a jumpy day on the front lines. do you find that even th
. also tonight, passing the baton. the u.s. is planning to turn over leadership of the libya mission to nato. tokyo's water is declared safe again, but not before a radiation scare causes a run on bottled water. and an air traffic controller in washington is suspended after falling asleep. leaving commercial jetliners to land on their own. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. every so often the census bureau gives americans a look in the mirror to see who we are and how we're changing and a report from the bureau today says one thing that's changing is the racial and ethnic makeup of the country with the hispanic population growing rapidly. one out of six adults is now hispanic as is one out of four children. in the past ten years, the overall u.s. population has grown by 27 million to 308 million and hispanics account for more than half the increase. more now from nancy cordes. >> reporter: salt lake city's newest grocery store caters to a group that census figur
across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.9, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top 1,000. most of the victims drowned. nearly 1,000 are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that dama
are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history triggered a ferocious series of tsunamis. a 23-foot wall of water poured over the northern japanese coastline with little warning. only minutes after the quick hit sweeping away everything and everyone in its path. cars were tossed like toys. boats were battered by the tides. this tanker was swept up on to the shore. another ship fought to escape a massive whirlpool. and the state of the boat and its crew is unknown. >> a tsunami obviously coming in several sweeps. >> reporter: minutes later a a second deadly wave. surging water overtook coastal city streets, ripping fishing boats from their moorings and swamping buildings.
traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sorry. we're probably going to be getting out of fukushima prefecture either late tonight or early tomorr
you! [ laughter ] >> couric: tonight, japan asks for u.s. help cooling nuclear reactors damaged by the earthquake as it tries desperately to prevent meltdown. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the unfolding humanitarian crisis. four days after the earthquake and tsunami, there are shortages of food and housing for the living. body bags and coffins for the growing number of dead. the search goes on for victims in towns virtually wiped off the map. and how safe are we with nuclear plants here at home built on fault lines and striking distances of tsunamis. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone, any one of them alone would be overwhelming, but japan is dealing with three crises: humanitarian, economic, and nuclear, including the possibility of a meltdown. we'll have much more about that in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10
that could cost him his job. a federal agent tells cbs news he was ordered to let guns from the u.s. make their way to mexican drug cartels. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama's message to qaddafi. >> the violence must stop. moammar qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead and he must leave. >> couric: with the threat of a lockout hanging over the players n.f.l. contract talks go into overtime. and sea otters under attack from sharks and something more mysterious. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they are two presidents leading a war against a common enemy: mexican drug cartels. president obama welcomed mexico's president felipe calderon to the white house today and mr. obama said the two countries are making progress against drug gangs. >> to combat the southbound flow of guns and money we are screening all southbound rail cargo, seizing many more guns bound for mexico and we are putting more gunrunners behind bars. >> couric: but one of the men on the
the tactic letting guns walk. in this case into the hands of criminals who would use them in mexico and the u.s. doddson's bosses say that never happened. now he's risking his job to go public. >> i'm boots on the ground here in phoenix and telling you we've been doing it everyday since i've been here. here i am. tell me i didn't do the things that i did. tell me you didn't order me to do the things i did. tell me it didn't happen. now you have a name on it, you have a face to put with it. here i am. someone. now tell me it didn't happen. >> reporter: agent doddson and other insiders say the gun-walking strategy was approved all the way to the justice department. the idea was to see where the guns ended up, build a big case and take down a major cartel and it was all kept secret from mexico. a.t.f. named the case "fast and furious." this surveillance video obtained by cbs news shows suspected drug cartel suppliers carrying boxes of weapons to their cars at a phoenix gun shop. those long boxes being loaded into the red car are a.k.-47 type assault rifles. >> reporter: so it turns out a.t.f. not
today. coffins and body bags are in short supply and crematoriums are overwhelmed. u.s. and other foreign aid is pouring in for the millions of survivors in need of food, water and housing. emergency shelters are overflowing. japan's central bank pumped billions of dollars into the country's economy to shore it up. the prime minister is taking charge of managing the nuclear crisis and he's asking the u.s. for technical expertise to cool the damaged reactors and prevent a meltdown. u.s. officials say experts see no scenario in which harmful levels of radiation will reach the united states. we have a team of correspondents deployed throughout japan tonight. first, celia hatton in fukushima >> reporter: japan's nuclear nightmare continues, a second hydrogen explosion at the fukushima dai-ichi nuclear complex in just three days injured 11 workers. like saturday's initial explosion, today's blast destroyed the reactor's exterior though officials say its core is intact. this was followed by news another reactor in the complex is also overheating so the prospect of a third explosion is l
't predict how long the operation will last, he did say the u.s. could transfer control of it to allied by saturday. meanwhile, house speaker boehner wrote to president obama today to complain that the mission's goals are not clearly defined. more now from mark phillips in tripoli. >> reporter: day five of the bombing campaign over libya and the combined coalition air forces have declared something like victory. >> their air force no longer exists as a fighting force. to the point that we can operat. >> reporter: control of the skies has led to near control on the ground, as moammar qaddafi's forces have learned. and as the bombing has continued, the brave face of the regime is showing some worry lines. instead of rambling on for hours as he often does, moammar qaddafi's latest pep rally's speech lasted a brief three minutes. out in public is a risky place for him to be these days. and where the obedient cheering crowds once numbered in tens of thousands, now they are often down to a few hundred, sometimes to mere dozens. even the regime's once p.r. machine is grinding down. today after
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)